Facilities Management

The issue with facilities management people isn’t too much different than it is when we talked about construction and real estate. We still are involved with those people when they’re doing maintenance and rehabilitation on their buildings. We probably spend a little bit more time doing indoor air quality types of surveys for them. We typically get the call that somebody showed up for work on a Monday morning, a pipe broke, leaked, or a sprinkler system let go over the weekend and they got six inches of water in the building. What do we do about it?

So we’ve done enough of this work over time so that we’re able to go in and tell them exactly what they need to do, not just to clean up the water, but then what do they need to do to clean up the building so that they don’t have a problem with mold or any other hazardous materials that may have been impacted by the water. We try to convince facilities type folks to have those relationships established before an accident like that happens so that all they need to do is place a phone call.

We’ve had that happen in two or three schools where, once we get the phone call, we have remediation contractors that are kind of on hold by us, that we can call and respond fairly quickly as opposed to the phone call that we get at 8 o’clock on a Sunday morning that this has happened: it’s from a customer we’ve never done work with before, they have no idea what they want to do, they’re in the part of the state where we don’t have a good contact. It wouldn’t help clean it up and it just takes longer to respond to a problem like that or an emergency like that. So it’s way better off if we have that kind of a relationship and a thought process long before they ever even have problems like that.